Blocking blue light for health

Here is why blue light blockers are essential for our well being.

Published by Odette Blacklock
on Sep 27, 2020


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There is nothing worse than feeling like a sleep deprived zombie during the day and a bright eyed bat during the night. Have you ever asked ‘why is my body clock so confused?’, and ‘how can I calibrate my body to the correct time?’.

Studies suggest that as blue light beams into our eyes at night through our smart phones, screens and energy efficient lighting, it causes us to feel wakeful when we should be winding down for sleep (1). Blue light from artificial sources is short-wavelength-enriched, meaning it has a higher concentration of blue light than natural light, such as sunlight (2). Blue light boosts alertness and regulates our circadian rhythm, or body clock, and suppresses our sleep inducing hormone, melatonin. It does this by activating photoreceptors called ‘intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells’ (ipRGCs) (3). Try to say that five times fast with sleep deprivation!

The consequences of sleep deprivation can be deadly. Sleep deprivation was linked to 3,017 deaths in 2016-17, with 394 being vehicle or industrial accidents, and the remainder of deaths linked with heart disease and diabetes (4). It is estimated that 7.4 million Australian adults experience some form of inadequate sleep (4). So a lot of us need a solution to this blue light induced sleep deprivation problem. 

The good news is that studies have found one. One interesting study measured participants wearing wavelength-blocking glasses three hours before bedtime who continued their nightly digital routine which included blue light screen time. Results showed a 58 percent increase in their nighttime sleep inducing hormone melatonin, out-performing over-the-counter melatonin supplements (3).

Lastly, it is important to recognise that our eyes natural filters do not provide sufficient protection against light rays from the sun, let alone the blue light emanating from digital devices. It is wise to choose a good quality pair of glasses that you will use frequently. So where can you find blue light blocking glasses? I found a great pair at Oscar Wylee that suited my taste and preference. I had one of the highly qualified optometrist put me through a thorough eye exam prior to picking my frames.

I have been using my blue light blocking frames each night and have found that I get to sleep much faster than before.

Sweet dreams people x

Please comment, like and share if you enjoyed this blog.

Please find the links to references and to Oscar Wylee eye care below.

http://www.oscarwylee.com.au/

References 

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/q-a-why-is-blue-light-before-bedtime-bad-for-sleep/

http://www.uh.edu/news-events/stories/2017/JULY%2017/07242017bluelight.php

http://www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/files/Asleep_on_the_job/Asleep_on_the_Job_SHF_report-WEB_small.pdf



Published by Odette Blacklock
on Sep 27, 2020


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